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How Does Birth Control Regulate Your Hormones

How Does Birth Control Regulate Your Hormones

Around 62% of women aged 20-29, 72% of women aged 30-39 and around 74% of women over 40 use birth control, but how does it affect our hormones? There are different types of birth control options that affect our hormones in different ways, so what are they and what do they do? Read our latest blog post to find out! Link in Bio!

Have you used birth control to regulate your hormones? Let us know in the comments!

Around 62% of women aged 20-29, 72% of women aged 30-39 and around 74% of women over 40 use birth control, but how does it regulate  our hormones? There are different types of birth control options that affect our hormones in different ways, so what are they and what do they do? Read this blog post to find out!

 

Birth Control Option #1: Oral Contraceptives


The birth control pill is the most commonly used form of contraception in the United States. There are different types of contraceptive pills and they differ based on the amount of the hormones estrogen and progestin (synthetic form of progesterone) are in them.
The combination birth control pill contains both estrogen and progestin whereas the mini pill contains only progestin. As you take either of these pills, your levels of estrogen and/or progestin increase in your body. High levels of these hormones prevent the ovary from releasing an egg

The birth control pill is used to treat a number of conditions including PCOS, endometriosis, irregular periods, menstrual cramps and conditions that are caused by low levels of estrogen. As the pill prevents the ovary from releasing an egg, the pill can help reduce the development of cysts associated with PCOS. The hormones released by the pill also make the lining of the uterus thinner, which results in lighter periods. This is why the pill is also used as a treatment for endometriosis.

 

Birth Control Option #2: Patches


Similar to the combination birth control pill, the contraceptive patch also contains both estrogen and progestin. As these hormones are released into the body through the skin, progestin and estrogen levels increase.

As the patch releases the same hormones into the body as the combination pill, it can also be used to treat irregular periods, cramps, endometriosis, low estrogen levels and PCOS.

 

Birth Control Option #3: Shot


The birth control shot is also known as Depo-Provera and is given at the doctor’s office around 
every 12 weeks. The shot only contains the hormone progestin, therefore it is not suitable to be used in the treatment of PCOS. However, the Depo-Provera shot has been shown to be effective in treating the symptoms of endometriosis and painful menstrual cramps as it can cause the lining of the uterus to become thinner.

 

Birth Control Option #4: Implant


The birth control implant is inserted as a rod into your arm and can last up to 3 years. The implant contains only progestin, therefore it has been shown to relieve the symptoms associated with endometriosis, as progestin can make the lining of the uterus thinner. This will also
ease the pain that accompanies menstrual cramps.

 

Birth Control Option #5: Intrauterine Devices


Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are small devices that are T-shaped made from either copper or plastic inserted into the uterus by a doctor or nurse. Some IUDs release progesterone into the uterus which can make the lining thinner, thus
effective against endometriosis and menstrual cramps.

Another type of IUDs release copper into the uterus. The effect of the copper is that it affects the mucus in the cervix, causing a difficult path for sperm to meet the egg. As copper IUDs do not release hormones, they are not used in the treatment of other conditions.

Birth Control Option #6: Vaginal Ring


A vaginal ring is placed inside of the vagina and it releases both estrogen and progestin into the lining of the vagina. Given that the vaginal ring increases both estrogen and progestin in your body, it has been shown to be effective against endometriosis, menstrual cramps, PCOS, irregular periods and low estrogen levels.

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